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TCPCV

TCPCV is a retro-style, text-based server for hosting your resume. For absolutely no practical reason, you can make your resume accessible in the most obsolete of ways: via Telnet.

Source: https://github.com/zachflower/tcpcv

  1. tl;dr
  2. Requirements
  3. Installation
  4. Usage

tl;dr

If you want to skip all of the pesky requirements, installation steps, and configuration details, then using TCPCV can be broken down into two major steps:

Start TCPCV

On the server that you wish to host TCPCV on:

$ tcpcv --resume=<path-to-resume.json> --port=<port> --motd=<motd>

Example

$ tcpcv --resume=resume.json --port=2468 --motd="John Doe"

Connect to TCPCV

On a client you wish to connect to TCPCV from:

$ telnet <address-of-tcpcv-server> <port>

Example

$ telnet 192.168.1.1 2468

Requirements

TCPCV has been tested with the following dependencies:

  • Node.js v10+

Installation

npm install --global tcpcv

Usage

$ tcpv --help

  TCPCV is a retro-style, text-based server for hosting your resume

  Usage:
    tcpcv [options]

  Options:
    --help            Display this help message
    --motd[=MOTD]     The hero text to display on connection (default: TCPCV)
    --port[=PORT]     The port to listen on (default: 2468)
    --resume[=RESUME] Path to the resume file (default: resume.json)
    --version         Display this application version

--motd[=MOTD]

By default, when a user connects to a TCPCV server, they are greeted with a generic hero text that we are calling our MOTD. It looks something like this:

  _____ ____ ____   ______     __
 |_   _/ ___|  _ \ / ___\ \   / /
   | || |   | |_) | |    \ \ / /
   | || |___|  __/| |___  \ V /
   |_| \____|_|    \____|  \_/

The --motd option can be used to override this text. For example, --motd="Jean-Luc Picard" would change the MOTD to this:

      _                        _                 ____  _                   _
     | | ___  __ _ _ __       | |   _   _  ___  |  _ \(_) ___ __ _ _ __ __| |
  _  | |/ _ \/ _` | '_ \ _____| |  | | | |/ __| | |_) | |/ __/ _` | '__/ _` |
 | |_| |  __/ (_| | | | |_____| |__| |_| | (__  |  __/| | (_| (_| | | | (_| |
  \___/ \___|\__,_|_| |_|     |_____\__,_|\___| |_|   |_|\___\__,_|_|  \__,_|

Note: Keep in mind that the MOTD is not word-wrapped, so use your best judgement when deciding on its length.

--port[=PORT]

TCPCV is hosted on port 2468 by default, however this can be overridden with the --port option. Keep in mind that any port under 1024 is considered a system port, and will require root and is highly discouraged.

Note: It may be tempting to bind TCPCV to port 23, the default Telnet port, however at this time TCPCV does not properly handle IAC commands, which will result in some unexpected behavior. If you'd like to add IAC support, please open a pull request.

--resume[=RESUME]

Without a resume, TCPCV would be effectively useless, so the --resume option is by far the most important. By default, this will look for a file called resume.json in the current directory, however you can override the path using this option. See below more information about the resume.json file format.

Configuration

By default, TCPCV expects a resume.json file in the executing directory to fill out the resume details. At its core, this file allows you to define an arbitrary number of sections—with two different section formats—giving you the flexibility to display the information that you care about. As an example, let's take a look at the resume.example.json file in this repository:

{
  "sections": {
    "info": {
      "title": "Info",
      "description": "Personal information",
      "data": [
        "Name: Jean-Luc Picard",
        "Email: jluc@starfleet.gov",
        "Tea: Earl Grey, Hot"
      ]
    },
    "education": {
      "title": "Education",
      "description": "Education history",
      "data": [
        {
          "header": [
            "Starfleet Academy",
            "San Francisco, United Earth"
          ],
          "subheader": [
            "Officer",
            "2323 - 2327"
          ]
        }
      ]
    },
    "employment": {
      "title": "Employment",
      "description": "Employment history",
      "data": [
        {
          "header": [
            "Starfleet",
            "San Francisco, United Earth"
          ],
          "subheader": [
            "Captain",
            "2333 - 2379"
          ],
          "body": "Ascended from bridge officer to captain on the USS Stargazer. Commanded the Stargazer for two decades. Creator of the \"Picard Maneuver.\" Commanded the USS Enterprise-D and Enterprise-E, exploring the great, unexplored mass."
        }
      ]
    }
  }
}

When parsed, this file is rendered for the end-user like so:

$ resume

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Info
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Name: Jean-Luc Picard
Email: jluc@starfleet.gov
Tea: Earl Grey, Hot

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Education
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Starfleet Academy                                    :  San Francisco, United Earth
Officer                                              :  2323 - 2327

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Employment
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Starfleet                                            :  San Francisco, United Earth
Captain                                              :  2333 - 2379
    Ascended from bridge officer to captain on the USS Stargazer. Commanded the
    Stargazer for two decades. Creator of the "Picard Maneuver." Commanded the
    USS Enterprise-D and Enterprise-E, exploring the great, unexplored mass.

String Blocks

As you can see, when a raw string is defined in a section's data block, it gets rendered exactly as written:

"data": [
  "Name: Jean-Luc Picard",
  "Email: jluc@starfleet.gov",
  "Tea: Earl Grey, Hot"
]

Becomes:

Name: Jean-Luc Picard
Email: jluc@starfleet.gov
Tea: Earl Grey, Hot

Object Blocks

Alternatively, a more structured format can be used to make the output a little cleaner:

"data": [
  {
    "header": [
      "Starfleet",
      "San Francisco, United Earth"
    ],
    "subheader": [
      "Captain",
      "2333 - 2379"
    ],
    "body": "Ascended from bridge officer to captain on the USS Stargazer. Commanded the Stargazer for two decades. Creator of the \"Picard Maneuver.\" Commanded the USS Enterprise-D and Enterprise-E, exploring the great, unexplored mass."
  }
]

Becomes:

Starfleet                                            :  San Francisco, United Earth
Captain                                              :  2333 - 2379
    Ascended from bridge officer to captain on the USS Stargazer. Commanded the
    Stargazer for two decades. Creator of the "Picard Maneuver." Commanded the
    USS Enterprise-D and Enterprise-E, exploring the great, unexplored mass.

The header and subheader values allow you to cleanly separate names, titles, locations, and dates in a clearly readable format, while the body value can be filled out to provide more detail about the entry—and, for the record, body is word-wrapped at 76 characters, so you don't have to worry about formatting.

Note: It's important to note that the header, subheader, and body values are all optional, so you can have a little control, over what gets displayed and where.